mellopetitone:

realsocialskills:

slashmarks:

realsocialskills:

mellopetitone:

realsocialskills:

anonymus-maximus said: And never never never ever attempt to touch a wind instrument -whilst it is being played-. Signed, Super cranky clarinetist who’s almost had their teeth knocked out a couple of times.

 

mellopetitone said:

Touching large brass instruments isn’t terrible. I’ve touched a tuba while someone was playing it because I couldn’t hear (low frequency loss) and it was kind of fun (with permission and all) and I would be annoyed but not super affected if someone touched my euphonium. On the other hand, anything moving while it’s touching your face can be bad. My mellophone bell got hit by a rifle when the guard set four steps too far back during a show and I had a split lip for over a week.

realsocialskills said:

I’m reblogging this without commentary because I don’t understand much about wind instruments.

slashmarks said:
The difference is that wind instruments sit up against or between your teeth most of the time. If you jar one, you’re either smacking or levering a heavy hard thing into the person’s teeth and could potentially hurt them badly. Brass instruments usually sit against your lips, so they would have to be pushed harder to knock into the player’ teeth or jaw, although it’s still possible.

realsocialskills said:

Ah, I see. That said, it’s still super rude and invasive to touch an instrument that someone is playing without being explicitly invited to do so.

mellopetitone said:

My point about specifying “large brass instruments” was two-fold. First, tuba and baritone and typically stabilized by the body, such as the arms, chest, and/or legs. They also have larger mouthpieces. A tuba mouthpiece on me barely touches my teeth. My euphonium mouthpiece touches my gum line a little but is mostly on my teeth. High brass mouthpieces are significantly smaller. A trumpet mouthpiece, used on mellophones (aka “marching french horns”) as well, is only on the teeth. A french horn mouthpiece is smaller still with a much thinner rim, even considering its size.

This means that the smaller the mouthpiece, the more force experienced by the player in a small area. The larger mouthpieces still hurt when hit, but the instruments are typically more stable (except trombones), move less, and the mouthpieces spread out the pressure. Getting hit with a smaller mouthpiece with the same force does more damage. Woodwind player have talked about teeth but the primary damage for brass players is to the lip, which is shoved with force between teeth and metal. The edges of the teeth can cut open the inner part of the lip. This is especially a danger for professional performers as any kind of injury can affect your playing and injury to the lips can put you out for weeks or longer. I knew a guy with a  serious lip injury who was still trying to get back to his original skill level two years later.