cussing

For the sake of vocabulary-building

What are some good words that are either:

  • Swears (eg: fuck)
  • Not-quite-swears that are clearly substitutes for actual cussing (eg: exclaiming fudge or sugar, saying something stinks instead of saying it sucks, etc) 
  • Clean insult words/phrases (“go step on legos”, asinine)

These are important words, and I know y'all know some I don’t.

calculusandcreamteas:

mellopetitone:

Hierarchies of cussing

realsocialskills:

I’ve never understood which swearwords are worse than others. It’s only in very recent years that I’ve heard people saying that the c-word is the worst of all. Before that I…

calculusandcreamteas said:

While freaking is in many ways a mild swear it is also a potential trigger for those bullied and harmed as a ‘freak’.

realsocialskills said:

I hadn’t thought of that. Do any of y'all also see it that way?

distraptortimeraptor:

Hierarchies of cussing

realsocialskills:

I’ve never understood which swearwords are worse than others. It’s only in very recent years that I’ve heard people saying that the c-word is the worst of all. Before that I assumed the f-word was the worst swearword. Is…

distraptortimeraptor said:

another swearing thing is that scatological swears tend to be lower on the scale if you’re using them to describe the thing they literally mean, “I just took an enormous shit”, for example. It is considered rude to tell people aside from doctors about your bodily functions but imo the specific words arent as big a deal unless its a formal setting, you being the mayor of one of the largest cities in North America, for example. Also “fucking” and “goddamn” as well as their variants are more or less acceptable inserted into the middle of words for emphasis, eg “Abso-fucking-lutely”

mellopetitone:

Hierarchies of cussing

realsocialskills:

I’ve never understood which swearwords are worse than others. It’s only in very recent years that I’ve heard people saying that the c-word is the worst of all. Before that I assumed the f-word was the worst swearword. Is there a pretty specific…

mellopetitone said:

Also, some words are considered swears by some and not by others. These, if considered swears or “bad words”, are generally considered to be some of the milder ones and, as mentioned in the original post, are often considered appropriate for some ages and not others. Examples are words like “crap”, “freaking”, “stupid”. (“Crap” is usually a substitute for “sh*t”. “Freaking” is usually a substitute for “f*cking”. “Freak” is only rarely a substitute for “f*ck”.)

These words are in a middle area where some people consider them swears/words that have restricted use and are inappropriate to say usually, but others consider them as mild/non-swear replacements for swear words and most others consider them to be just as mild as any other word in the language.

These words may gain some force when used to replace a swear word, especially if said with strong emotions. An example is “*angrily* You’re full of crap!” That use has more negativity than saying “Crap!” when you accidentally drop what you’re carrying or refer to something you dislike by saying “Oh, not that crap again.”

realsocialskills said:

Also sometimes the level of force is more important than which words are being used.

Some people’s “darn it” is more frightening than other people’s “fuck off”.

one thing about what age it becomes acceptable to swear: it can vary not just depending on location, it can also vary depending on your gender and disability status, and possibly other things i know less about. if you are female and/or disabled, people may want to preserve your “innocence” and may have a bad reaction to you swearing at a later age than they would if you were an able-bodied, neurotypical male. this is especially true for severely disabled people, regardless of gender.
realsocialskills said:
Yes, this is definitely true.
It can also be connected to not wanting people to be able to have boundaries.
Cussing is a particularly emphatic and unequivocal form of “no”.
Some people aren’t perceived as having a right to that kind of power.

Hierarchies of cussing

anonymous asked:
I’ve never understood which swearwords are worse than others. It’s only in very recent years that I’ve heard people saying that the c-word is the worst of all. Before that I assumed the f-word was the worst swearword. Is there a pretty specific hierarchy of severity?
 

realsocialskills answered:

It depends on the context.

There are different kinds of swear words:

  • Profanity based on religious concepts (“Go to hell”, “Goddammit”)
  • Sexual or scatological swears (“Fuck off”, “shit”)
  • Then there are slurs that derive their power from invoking hatred of a particular group (eg, the n-word, the r-word, the t-word and the g-word (I don’t like to spell out slurs - if you don’t know which words I mean, send me an ask and I’ll tell you).

There is also some ambiguity:

  • Sexual swears have substantial overlap with misogynist or homophobic slurs
  • Telling someone to “fuck off” generally isn’t a slur, but telling someone they need to get laid often is, and calling someone a 
  • Calling someone a bastard or an SOB tends to not be meant literally or intended to invoke stigma associated with being born out of wedlock. But it definitely has origins as a slur and is often still intentionally used that way. It’s the kind of swear word that is highly context dependent - in some situations it’s considered a fairly mild swear; among people who are regularly called those things as slurs it is *not* mild
  • In the US, calling someone the c-word is a misogynist slur. I’m not sure that’s the case in other parts of the world

Which type of swear word is considered more severe is heavily context-dependent:

  • In secular culture, religion-related profanity is generally considered the mildest. That is not necessarily the case among religious people.
  • Slurs properly *ought* to be considered the worst words, but they tend not to be. For instance, you can say them on television without bleeping in the US, but you can’t say most of the sexual and scatological swears
  • But some people aren’t offended at all by “fuck”, but are extremely offended by slurs (that might be behind people’s reaction to the word "cunt").

A lot also depends on how the word is being used. There are a lot of nuances. For instance, here are some variations on the uses of scatological, sexual, and profane swear words:

  • Saying a word by itself to express frustration or pain is one of the more mild forms of swearing (eg: dropping something on your toe and exclaiming “fuck!”). This is generally considered acceptable for adults, although the range of words considered acceptable varies. 
  • This is generally not considered acceptable for young children; the age at which it becomes socially acceptable depends a lot on where you are
  • Using a cuss word to describe someone or their work is considered more severe (eg: “That’s a shitty piece of art.”; “People who think that’s ok can just fuck right off”)
  • Actually saying the word to someone you think it about directly is the most severe form of swearing, generally speaking (eg: “Fuck you”.)

These words can get really complicated and confusing, and the rules are different in different places. It’s not just you - it’s confusing and context dependent.

Avoiding slurs is not about sanitizing language

Cussing is important. Here are some uses:

  • Expressing boundaries in forceful language
  • Expressing emphatic contempt
  • Expressing distress

Sometimes it’s ok to insult people. Sometimes it’s important to be rude.

Slurs aren’t part of this, though. It’s not ok to insult someone by comparing them to an oppressed group. It’s not ok to insult someone by referencing their membership in an oppressed group.

Lists of things to say rather than “that’s so gay” or “that’s so r-word” tend to be long lists of big words that are clean and polite. They shouldn’t be, though. There’s no moral obligation to use long words. There’s no moral obligation to always use clean language.

The problem with slurs is that they help to keep marginalized groups marginalized. They hurt innocent people, and they hurt guilty people in ways no one deserves.

So, when the situation calls for cussing at or about someone, use swear words. Don’t use slurs.

Avoiding slurs is not about sanitizing language

andreashettle:

realsocialskills:

Cussing is important. Here are some uses:

  • Expressing boundaries in forceful language
  • Expressing emphatic contempt
  • Expressing distress

Sometimes it’s ok to insult people. Sometimes it’s important to be rude.

Slurs aren’t part of this, though. It’s not ok to insult someone by comparing them to an oppressed group. It’s not ok to insult someone by referencing their membership in an oppressed group.

Lists of things to say rather than “that’s so gay" or “that’s so r-word" tend to be long lists of big words that are clean and polite. They shouldn’t be, though. There’s no moral obligation to use long words. There’s no moral obligation to always use clean language.

The problem with slurs is that they help to keep marginalized groups marginalized. They hurt innocent people, and they hurt guilty people in ways no one deserves.

So, when the situation calls for cussing at or about someone, use swear words. Don’t use slurs.

And if you can’t bring yourself to use swear words, ever, then STILL don’t use slurs. Use it as an opportunity to excercise your brain in creativity in devising insults or other forms of strong or emphatic language without using slurs or any of the swear words you aren’t comfortable with.

Yes. Slurs are *more* obscene than swears, not less.

Proloquo2go now has a bunch of new features.

youneedacat:

I don’t know if the new version will be crashier or less crashy than the last version. But it’s got some really cool new features.

Particularly, certain voices have had the voice actors record a number of new words. Some of them include swearing. Such that when you type the words (or sounds, like #aargh3 or something, or certain words with exclamation points after) they either make certain sounds, or else say the word with feeling. The best voice actor I’ve heard so far is the Lisa voice, which is female adult Australian English. So I’m using that one, because it has all the swear words available. And yes it will now say things like Fuck off! And, Piss off! And, Arsehole! With actual feeling. Which I love. Some of the voice actors are better than others. Some of them will say angry things while simply sounding vaguely generally emotional.

You can get a list of all the voice effects by creating a button, then at the side of the first line, there’s a little speech bubble you click on. Then you can listen to samples of all of them, or add them in. There are also macros, so that you can get it to say things like the current date.

I’m really going to enjoy this. Time to reprogram my swear words page, for instance, to include a lot of the more emotional renderings of the words. I’m glad they finally recognized that AAC users swear. Although there’s a lot of variation between the voices on what is available. Some will only say damn while others will say fuck, arsehole, bloody hell, piss off, etc. And I love this acknowledgement that AAC users actually need to be able to cuss, when so many people are hell bent on making sure we can be nothing but polite and passive.