disabled

livingalifeoflearning:

realsocialskills:

do you know of any resources for art things for disabled or poor folks? (poor because lack of resources to get a hold of most comercially sold art supplies, disabled because I have Things I Don’t Have a Name For that make it hard for me to…

livingalifeoflearning said:

I don’t know what sort of art things you’re into, but temporary art can generally be done for free and can be quite pleasing, especially if the process is your focus, not the product. These things can require a very low level of fine motor skills and might be easier on stiff joints.

Things like:
- Drawing in sand/dirt with a stick or your fingers
-Sidewalk chalk can be cheap and makes all hard surfaces your canvas
-Building sandcastles or other earthworks
-Arranging stone towers with rocks around your house
-Arranging flowers

You can also take a picture of any of these if you want to keep something of something you made.

ada-adorable:

realsocialskills:

do you know of any resources for art things for disabled or poor folks? (poor because lack of resources to get a hold of most comercially sold art supplies, disabled because I have Things I Don’t Have a Name For…

ada-adorable said:

I’ve been making things out of cardboard and paper lately! Because I have a lot of cardboard boxes and stuff around and it’s easy to just throw things together with tape. I’m not sure if this would be super helpful for everyone, but I like it because it’s a lot easier to work on projects when I don’t have to buy or choose fancy supplies. It’s a lot easier to just try stuff out when you’re literally working with scraps of cardboard that would otherwise go in the trash.

How To: Ask a Cripple if They Need Help

uctdgirl:

cripple-fabulous:

sheblet:

I sincerely wish we lived in a world where asking a cripple if they needed help wasn’t so confusing for people.

Rule number 1 of asking a cripple if they need help: DON’T DO IT.

It is generally a much safer route if you wait till they ask you to help them. Stop for a moment and consider how you would feel if you were, I don’t know, putting something in your backpack, totally chill and normal, and someone asked you if you needed help or, better yet, abruptly started doing it for you. How embarrassed would you feel? Annoyed?

There is a man in one of my classes who, every time I see him, asks if I am okay or if I need help. Now, he’s a really nice guy, and I know he means well, but know that it gets old really fast for us cripples when you constantly ask if we need help. It is also embarrassing.We are perfectly capable, and when you ask constantly if we need help, it implies that you think we are not capable.

Just some thoughts for the able-bodied folk out there who are unsure of whether or not they should ask a disabled person if they need help.

Agreed. Now, that doesn’t mean you should never ask if they need help. Just think about situations where you would ask an able-bodied person if they needed help. 

Here are some helpful examples:

  • Carrying a box or other large/awkward object
  • Obviously struggling 
  • If they’ve appeared to have been hurt (lying on the ground, falling, whatever)
  • If they’re very very obviously in need of help (that’s a very subjective one though, so use it sparingly)

Also an addition to the number one rule: DO NOT just go and help them without their permission. 

Examples include:

  • Going up behind someone and starting to push their wheelchair
  • Picking someone up and carrying them (yes, this happened to my mom because this guy thought that since she was blind, she couldn’t get up on the bus step)
  • Taking their belongings and carrying them

TL;DR: ASK first, HELP with PERMISSION, BACK OFF if the person says no.

Reblogging on this blog as well so it reaches more people. This is important!