headphones

buckybits:

Headphones to reduce noise?

beautifuloutlier:

realsocialskills:

realsocialskills:

said to :

A friend of mine recently lent me her noise-canceling earmuffs that she uses for the firing range at a party, and I found them super helpful for avoiding getting overwhelmed by the…

buckybits said

I often “hear my own blood” in my ears when I’m sick or have a headache. Most closed-ear headphones replicate this feeling immediately and rather painfully, so I normally stick with earbuds that aren’t those silicon sealing types, or open-ear headphones that have their drivers close to my ear canal. Over-the ear clip-on style are pretty awesome, but earbuds keep wind and similar noises out better.

wolfesbrain:

Headphones to reduce noise?

actualtsoni:

realsocialskills:

realsocialskills:

said to :

A friend of mine recently lent me her noise-canceling earmuffs that she uses for the firing range at a party, and I found them super helpful for avoiding getting overwhelmed by the noisiness of…

wolfesbrain said:

If price is an issue, you can also look for “noise-isolating” or “noise-blocking” kit. Noise canceling is (if I’m understanding things correctly) supposed to be an active process of taking in sound and putting out sound waves that’re equal and opposite so that they cancel out.

Noise-isolating/blocking is usually passive and works as it sounds, by blocking sound from entering the ear.

As for brand reccs, I have a bad habit of pushing Skullcandy brand gear. They’re well-built, reasonably priced, and of high enough quality that someone who’s not an audiophile won’t complain. Plus, they’ve got an awesome warranty. Manaufacturers defects equal replacement no questions asked, if you destroy them accidentally, they’ll give you a credit for 50% of the current MSRP of the broken device towards the purchase of a new one.

Headphones to reduce noise?

actualtsoni:

realsocialskills:

 said to :

A friend of mine recently lent me her noise-canceling earmuffs that she uses for the firing range at a party, and I found them super helpful for avoiding getting overwhelmed by the noisiness of the group. They were only comfortable to wear for about 45 minutes-an hour, though. Do you or any of your followers have any advice on how to find similar earmuffs/headphones that would be comfortable for long wear on a very large adult head?

realsocialskills said:

I don’t know, but I bet a lot of people who read this do.

People who use earmuffs or headphones to avoid auditory overload - which kind do you use? What’s the most comfortable? And where can you buy them?

actualtsoni said:

i find earmuffs to be uncomfortable in general, triggering a lot of my sensory overload triggers anyways. trade off auditory overload for tactile overload, not exactly what i wanna do.

so i went with headphones instead. bose noise-cancelling headphones are designed to be comfortable and cancel noise pretty well, but theyre definitely not strong enough for very noisy situations. for those i usually have to play enya through the headphones instead, which has saved me from quite a few overload situations, especially in places like my school cafeteria. the combination of music and noise cancellation has helped me, personally, but i know its different for everyone.

plus no one really questions you wearing bose headphones everywhere. theyre pretty nice headphones, so why wouldnt you? they can be expensive, but definitely not as expensive as beats. not sure if lower-quality headphones would also do the trick, but i went as high as my budget would allow and have never regretted it, theyve become essential in my life since. couldnt live without them.

you can get them at best buy and look for labels that describe them as noise cancelling, or if you can, ask one of the people there that youre looking for headphones with good sound quality and noise cancellation. theyll try to sell you beats, so you have to say something like “i don’t care about brand recognition” or “i don’t need beats, just good headphones.” you’ll be paying for the brand, and you only want to be paying for the noise cancellation.

iguanafish:

Headphones to reduce noise?

said to :

A friend of mine recently lent me her noise-canceling earmuffs that she uses for the firing range at a party, and I found them super helpful for avoiding getting overwhelmed by the noisiness of the group. They were only comfortable to…

iguanafish said:

My mom has a set of Bose noise canceling headphones, there’s a switch that actually blocks background noise but you can still hear voices clearly (but quieter).

They also work as music headphones. They are heavy but very padded–maybe more so that firing range or construction muffs since they’re for everyday wear?

I think they are quite expensive.

jemthecrystalgem:

Headphones to reduce noise?

said to :

A friend of mine recently lent me her noise-canceling earmuffs that she uses for the firing range at a party, and I found them super helpful for avoiding getting overwhelmed by the noisiness of the group. They were only comfortable to…

jemthecrystalgem said:

https://www.therapyshoppe.com/category/1386-sleeping-sensory-defensiveness-special-needs-child-therapy-products

Idk how comfy they are but there’s something like that here

lilyrosethedreamer:

Headphones can mean leave me alone

realsocialskills:

When people are in public places like a library, street, coffee shop,or subway, they often wear headphones as a way to create some private space.

People who wear headphones or earbuds in public usually do not want to be approached by strangers. If you know them well, it might be ok to ask, but…

lilyrosethedreamer said

I have noticed as well that people with only one earphone in are still wanting to be talked to. It’s a technique that I’ve employed as well actually: when I don’t want to talk, I’ll have both in and when I do, I’ll only use the one. Hope this helps too, might be different for others though.

attenua:

Social skills for autonomous people: Meeting sensory needs without violating boundaries

realsocialskills:

Sometimes people feel a strong need for a certain kind of sensory input, and then use other people’s bodies to meet that need even over their objections.

It’s not ok to do that. Not for sex, not for comfort, not for any other reason. People’s bodies are their own.

But sensory-seeking isn’t the…

Forgot to reblog when I first saw it to add: the best headphones I have ever encountered for music-listening as a sensory thing are noise-isolating headphones, like these ones: http://www.skullcandy.com/shop/ink-d-purple-black?cid=005%7CPriceGrabber . They are like a combination of earplugs and headphones. You can shut out outside noise with a lot lower volume of music than it would otherwise take, and if your music-maker is broken, you can hum quietly under your breath. Because they work like earplugs, you’ll hear your voice resonating really loudly, and you won’t be able to hear as much outside.

As a bonus, they’re super-comfy.