making sure you eat

more low spoons food suggestions

snowiedear:

For me it’s Clif bars, microwaveable Trader Joe’s bao, Annie Chun’s udon, and scrambled eggs. I agree with all of the above - eating anything is ALWAYS better than eating nothing at all. There’s a difference between eating chips when you’re bored and snacky and then feeling gross, and eating chips because it’s afternoon and you haven’t put any food in your body all day and if you eat you will have a little bit more energy and not feel like gross tired shit. Sometimes it’s that much of a difference. Sometimes I only feel up to eating the chocolate coconut bars because the peanut butter ones don’t feel worth the effort of chewing it.

Eating anything is better for your body and mind and routine and mental state. Full. Stop. You do what you have to do and sometimes that’s just ice cream.

I was just going through your blog and found the posts about making food when you’re low on spoons and I thought I’d add my two cents even though it’s kind of an old post. If I’m high enough on spoons to cook something small, I’ve found it helps to make something in a small pot and eat it out of the pot (like pasta, or soup). That way I only have the pot and the fork/spoon to wash - and if I’m too low on spoons to wash ANYTHING after, it’s fewer dishes in the sink.

When food is too hard

self-assuring-love:

realsocialskills:

lanthir:

realsocialskills:

fedorasandstuff:

 

I so cannot wait for it to be cold enough to run the oven without dying.  I miss being able to throw some chicken nuggets in the oven and then have food 6 minutes later.  The oven makes so much I don’t want to cook food possible.

realsocialskills said:

Could you get a toaster oven? I find toaster ovens really useful for exactly that reason.

lanthir said

Oh my gods yes!  And toaster ovens preheat practically instantly, because they’re so small!
They’re perfect for stuff like, cooking frozen snack things, and making cheese toast or cinnamon toast, and all sorts of really quick, easy foods!

realsocialskills said

The other advantage to toaster ovens is that a lot of them have timers that can make them automatically shut off when the time is up.

That’s a really useful safety feature for people who tend to get distracted and start fires.

self-assuring-love said:

On the other hand, if you’re sensitive to noises or in a small space, try your toaster oven’s “stay on” option (maybe combined with a timer). Some toaster ovens tick incredibly loudly when set to shut off at a time, but will be silent/much quieter when set to “stay on”. 

realsocialskills said:

That’s also a good point.

reesa-chan:

Social skills for autonomous people: When food is too hard

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing food seem so hard that you’d nearly prefer to just go hungry?
A couple of suggestions:
Order a pizza, or some…

reesa-chan said:

This. So much this. Also, some grocery stores will deliver food if you happen to be lucky enough to live in the right city. I have one on my list of resources for when spoons have been completely exhausted. They also deliver toilet paper, which is the most crazy awesome thing ever. Also other things, but delivery toilet paper! How amazing is it to know that if you run out but can’t face leaving the house, someone will BRING YOU TOILET PAPER!

Depending on how your brain works, it might be worth being careful about the disposable dishes, though. I know that for me it’s even harder to deal with a build up of trash than a build up of dirty dishes (and don’t get me started on how overwhelming those dishes can be!), so if you’re like me it might be easier to either reuse a mildly dirty dish or to figure out a way to go without using dishes for this meal or, if you have the resources, to wash just the one dish you’re going to eat off of.

realsocialskills said:

That’s a good point about trash. Disposable dishes aren’t a good solution for everyone.

I keep food in my room for days in which I can’t leave. But ants keep finding it. What do I do?
Have you tried keeping the food in sealed ziplock bags? I’ve found that to be at least somewhat effective.
That doesn’t work against mice though. If you also have a mouse problem, the only thing that works is keeping food in a closed plastic bin with a tight-fitting lid.

nimbusdx:

Social skills for autonomous people: When food is too hard

realsocialskills:

Content warning: This post is my reply to someone who reblogged calling some of my low-spoons food strategies lazy and unhealthy. Some of y’all might be better off skipping this one.

watsonly:

realsocialskills:

Related to the…

nimbusdx said:

As someone who has been severely depressed, I can assure this person that using a blender (!?!?!) is WAY WAY WAY out of the question. When my depression was at it’s worst, I had to have a friend call me throughout the day and convince me to eat. At that time, even making a TV dinner was too many steps for me to handle.

I actually did eat a lot of yogurt with honey though. There isn’t any snack much easier to prepare than a cup of yogurt. You just peel the lid off and go. I ate a lot of applesauce cups too. You don’t even need use a spoon. You can literally just pour it into your mouth.

Also, if the honey is in a squeeze bottle like mine is, there is no complicated cleanup required. It’s actually a really convenient way to to plain foods like yogurt cups or applesauce cups a little more palatable without needing to use a spoon, knife, or fork.

inthepressofeverykiss:

: When food is too hard

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing food seem so hard that you’d nearly prefer to just go hungry?
A couple of suggestions:
Order a pizza, or some other form of food that gets delivered to you
  • Hunger feeds on itself and makes everything harder
  • If you’re in a state of mind where preparing food seems too difficult to be bearable, ordering food can often break that cycle
  • So can getting takeout or going to McDonalds
  • This is not a frivolous expense
  • And it’s not necessarily more expensive than preparing your own food. McDonalds has a dollar menu.
  • When you’re starving from not eating, it is not the time to worry about health food. Making sure that you eat comes first. Eating anything (that you’re not allergic to) is healthier than regularly going hungry because you can’t bring yourself to eat.

Keep stuff around that’s easy to eat and doesn’t require any preparation or only need to be microwaved, for instance:

  • A box of cereal
  • Chocolate
  • Granola bars
  • Ice cream
  • Popsickles
  • Protein shakes
  • Rice cakes
  • Peanut butter
  • TV dinners
  • Frozen chicken nuggets
  • It can also help to keep around disposable plates and utensils so the thought of having to wash dishes doesn’t deter you from eating

Get someone else to tell you that you need to eat:

  • Sometimes it’s easier to remember that eating is important if someone else tells you
  • For instance, if you text a friend saying “remind me that I need to eat” and they do, that can sometimes make it more possible

Get someone else to talk you through the steps of making food:

  • If there’s someone you can ask how to find/make food, that can be helpful
  • Sometimes what’s really exhausting is not so much doing the steps, as it is anticipating them, or figuring out what they are
  • If someone can help you through that, it can make it much more possible

inthepressofeverykiss said:

filed under “reasons I’m taking a cooking class while I’m in Canberra because then I have to remember to eat”

realsocialskills said:

Sometimes for me, the problem is cognitive rather than being low on spoons.

And when that’s the problem, I can often get the right cognitive cues by doing cooking-as-an-activity rather than preparing-food-in-order-to-eat. Which is a reason that often, the most reliable way for me to make sure I eat is by cooking for other people.

I could totally see how taking a cooking class could work for that too.

little-mourning-magpie:

Social skills for autonomous people: sugaredvenom: The Reblogging Machine: When food is too…

sugaredvenom:

The Reblogging Machine: When food is too hard

thetigerisariver:

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing…

has anyone mentioned rice cookers yet? they’re so useful when you can’t do cooking because there’s no time limit, they keep the rice warm for up to like… 24 hours or something. so you put tonnes of rice on when you have energy then eat it whenever you don’t.

i eat a lot of plain rice because i’m boring and texture is more important to me than taste.

Yes, rice cookers can be good. You can also use sauces to make the rice taste better. (Or add a pinch of salt to the water when you cook it).

Also canned beans can be a good thing to eat with rice.

Hi Im a low-income vegan with executive function problems so I thought Id try to list some foods that help me get by when Im having trouble with meals.

Oatmeal can be super helpful. It keeps you full for a while, is easy to make (heat water, add it to oatmeal, bam done) and you can throw some fruits and nuts in there too. I personally hate the texture of oatmeal, so I use bulgur wheat instead which is really similar. Im sure you can find some other alternatives pretty easily if you google it.

Frozen vegetables are super cheap (1-2$ a bag) and you can cook them on the stove in around 5 minutes usually. If you can afford it, fresh vegetables are great because you can just eat them raw.

Kale is also cheap, usually a dollar for a big bunch of it, and you can just snack on it raw. If you dont like the taste, put some olive oil and salt on them and pop them in the oven for a few minutes.

Potatoes- cheap and filling. It does take them a long time to cook, but its a simple process. just poke some holes, rub some vegetable oil on them, and stick them in the oven. takes about an hour, just dont forget to set a timer or something! (you can also microwave them in about 5 minutes. not as tasty and you lose some nutrition, but its so much easier)

Trail mix- not much else to say about this. cheap, tons of nutrients, delicious, and you dont have to prepare anything. (you could also make your own)

Also:


When I have extra cash I try to stock up on fresh fruits and veggies, theyre a pretty important part of your diet and you can just keep them nearby to eat raw whenever you dont have the energy to cook.

For times that you do have the energy to cook things, make double the amount so you can have leftovers that you can quickly reheat later. Rice and beans are a good choice because combined, they make a complete protein, plus they are super cheap.

Check to see if your grocery store has a reduced produce section. You can get slightly bruised/old fruit for about half the price. Some places have reduced grocery too, and they mark things down really really cheap just because the box is a little dented etc.

agreywood:

realsocialskills:

sugaredvenom:

The Reblogging Machine: When food is too hard

thetigerisariver:

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing food seem so hard that you’d nearly prefer to just go hungry?
A…

Slow cookers are good too! Prep veg and portion it, keep in the freezer if you want, add some carbs, beans or whatever, meat if you want (not frozen) and don’t worry about it until it’s time to eat.

I’ve heard good things about slow cookers, but have yet to figure out how to make that work.

Slow cooker for low energy people:
peel skin off onion. slice of ends. cut in half. put in slow cooker.
Put chicken/beef/vegitable/whatever your stock of choice is in the slow cooker. Typically go to just the top of the onion.
Toss in any veg you like mushy.
Salt & pepper a pot roast or other large hunk of meat
If you have the time/energy, brown roast in pan. If you don’t, skip this. It will still be yummy.
Put roast on top of your onions. They will hold it mostly out of the stock.
Put on lid. turn on crock pot. ignore crock pot for HOURS*
about an hour or so before you will eat, toss in any veggies you only like a little mushy.
if you have the energy, use a stick blender (or regular) and some corn starch or flour to turn the stock, onions, and any way-to-mushy-to eat veggies into gravy!
eat, then put leftovers in fridge.

*if you are prone to forgetting about your food while cooking, make sure you have a crock pot that will auto-switch from cooking to “keep warm”. If you’re using the 12 hour setting it won’t be a huge deal, but you may overcook things if you’re using one of the faster cooking settings. This doesn’t matter much with a pot roast but might if you were making a cream soup or something.
-
On a non-pot roast topic, quinoa is great for make-ahead meals. I make about 2 cups at a time. You need to pay attention while toasting it, but once the stock is in it needs less attention than rice (imo) and it tastes good cold, so if I put it in single-serving tupperware containers then I can just pull it out of the fridge and eat immediately.

edited to add actual spaces because tumblr hates me

karalianne:

realsocialskills:

sugaredvenom:

The Reblogging Machine: When food is too hard

thetigerisariver:

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing food seem so hard that you’d nearly prefer to just go hungry?
A…

Slow cookers are good too! Prep veg and portion it, keep in the freezer if you want, add some carbs, beans or whatever, meat if you want (not frozen) and don’t worry about it until it’s time to eat.

I’ve heard good things about slow cookers, but have yet to figure out how to make that work.

I like my slow cooker but you need to do a lot of anticipating for it to work. Like, you need to put everything into the pot in the morning (noon at the latest). And then it’ll be ready for dinner. That doesn’t really help in the rest of the day. It’s not a fast thing.

But it is easier for making whole meals. I can prep a roast beef dinner in about 15 minutes as follows:

  1. Cut up 4-5 potatoes (there are only two of us) and put them in the bottom of the slow cooker.
  2. Put in the roast (frozen works just as well as thawed).
  3. Add some frozen veggies around the sides of the roast.
  4. Add about 2 cups of water.
  5. Put the lid on.
  6. Turn it to “low” and leave it to cook.

I usually get this started by about 8.30 a.m. and it’s totally ready by 6.00 p.m. Like, the meat doesn’t slice, it basically falls apart. The potatoes are nice and tender, too.

You can make chili really easily too, and then it’s vegan/vegetarian. Dump all your usual ingredients into the slow cooker and let it cook on low until it’s bubbling. This could be ready for lunch or for dinner. The drawback for meat chili is that you have to pre-cook the ground beef and that’s annoying and takes extra time. But for a meatless chili, here’s what you could use:

  • 2 cans of kidney beans
  • 2 cans of black beans
  • 1 can of corn niblets
  • 2 cans of diced tomatoes
  • 1 can of tomato paste (the tiny ones)
  • 1 can of mushrooms
  • water if it’s too thick but it probably won’t be, add a cup at a time
  • 2 teaspoons of chili powder
  • a few shakes of Tabasco sauce
  • whatever other spices you like in chili

If you have the spoons, you can chop an onion and a green pepper and a couple stalks of celery and add those, too. Or chop them all up when you have the spoons and then put them in the freezer for later.

Also, chili freezes nicely and so you can make lots and put it in containers in the freezer for later. Keep one or two containers in the fridge so you don’t have to wait for it to thaw, and when you use one you can pull another out of the freezer and put it in the fridge. I usually reheat stuff from the fridge on high for about 3 minutes, but that might change depending on your microwave.