when food is too hard

dysfunctionalqueer:

realsocialskills:

slepaulica:

realsocialskills:

wikdsushi:

[GJ] Great Post About ASD Diagnostic Process!

girljanitor:

realsocialskills:

I don’t really know how to say this the best way, but apparently I “might” have Aspergers. I had been having some trouble at college, and the woman we spoke to at disabilities services said that…

wikdsushi said:

Hang on, forgetting to eat is an Aspie trait?

realsocialskills said:

It can be, yes.

For a couple of reasons:

  • Autistic people have trouble with sensory processing, and noticing hunger relies on accurately interpreting certain sensations
  • For some autistic people, this means that it’s actually hard to consistently notice hunger
  • Autistic people often have trouble with executive functioning that can make the process of getting food confusing enough that you end up not bothering often enough
  • Autistic people also often have trouble identifying things as edible and realizing that it’s possible to eat them and not be hungry anymore

I wrote a post a while back on how to cope when food is too hard.

slepaulica said:

I have a lot of trouble with the last one.  I will go into a store that only sells food and look at all the things and none of it will look like food for reasons I don’t fully understand and I will walk out of the store having only bought a chocolate milk.

it can help to have a plan for what i’m trying to make out of the food, sometimes. but not always.

it’s like:

me: are you food?

carrot: no, i’m not food. i’m an ingredient.

me: oh, oh well.

(completely forgetting that i like carrots and that they go well in many of the things i like to cook)

if I can hold it in memory that I’m looking for ingredients, and even better, that i’m looking for certain ingredients, my success rate improves.

realsocialskills said:

This. Or I’ll buy a random assortment of things, none of which seem edible when I get home.

dysfunctionalqueer said:

I tend to have really specific sensory desires for food, and if they can’t be met i’ll just not end up eating. Like if I’m hungry for salty chicken soup, and we don’t have chicken soup, i’ll just not eat, because even if we have something close it wont be the same. Plus terrible exec functioning skills means that even if we do have that food, i might not be able to make it. this is why i live almost entirely off of popcorn and diet coke, because those two are always sensory friendly.

realsocialskills said:

I do that too, so I try to always keep around the foods that are reliably edible for me.

slepaulica:

realsocialskills:

wikdsushi:

[GJ] Great Post About ASD Diagnostic Process!

girljanitor:

realsocialskills:

I don’t really know how to say this the best way, but apparently I “might” have Aspergers. I had been having some trouble at college, and the woman we spoke to at disabilities services said that…

wikdsushi said:

Hang on, forgetting to eat is an Aspie trait?

realsocialskills said:

It can be, yes.

For a couple of reasons:

  • Autistic people have trouble with sensory processing, and noticing hunger relies on accurately interpreting certain sensations
  • For some autistic people, this means that it’s actually hard to consistently notice hunger
  • Autistic people often have trouble with executive functioning that can make the process of getting food confusing enough that you end up not bothering often enough
  • Autistic people also often have trouble identifying things as edible and realizing that it’s possible to eat them and not be hungry anymore

I wrote a post a while back on how to cope when food is too hard.

slepaulica said:

I have a lot of trouble with the last one.  I will go into a store that only sells food and look at all the things and none of it will look like food for reasons I don’t fully understand and I will walk out of the store having only bought a chocolate milk.

it can help to have a plan for what i’m trying to make out of the food, sometimes. but not always.

it’s like:

me: are you food?

carrot: no, i’m not food. i’m an ingredient.

me: oh, oh well.

(completely forgetting that i like carrots and that they go well in many of the things i like to cook)

if I can hold it in memory that I’m looking for ingredients, and even better, that i’m looking for certain ingredients, my success rate improves.

realsocialskills said:

This. Or I’ll buy a random assortment of things, none of which seem edible when I get home.

more low spoons food suggestions

snowiedear:

For me it’s Clif bars, microwaveable Trader Joe’s bao, Annie Chun’s udon, and scrambled eggs. I agree with all of the above - eating anything is ALWAYS better than eating nothing at all. There’s a difference between eating chips when you’re bored and snacky and then feeling gross, and eating chips because it’s afternoon and you haven’t put any food in your body all day and if you eat you will have a little bit more energy and not feel like gross tired shit. Sometimes it’s that much of a difference. Sometimes I only feel up to eating the chocolate coconut bars because the peanut butter ones don’t feel worth the effort of chewing it.

Eating anything is better for your body and mind and routine and mental state. Full. Stop. You do what you have to do and sometimes that’s just ice cream.

When food is too hard

self-assuring-love:

realsocialskills:

lanthir:

realsocialskills:

fedorasandstuff:

 

I so cannot wait for it to be cold enough to run the oven without dying.  I miss being able to throw some chicken nuggets in the oven and then have food 6 minutes later.  The oven makes so much I don’t want to cook food possible.

realsocialskills said:

Could you get a toaster oven? I find toaster ovens really useful for exactly that reason.

lanthir said

Oh my gods yes!  And toaster ovens preheat practically instantly, because they’re so small!
They’re perfect for stuff like, cooking frozen snack things, and making cheese toast or cinnamon toast, and all sorts of really quick, easy foods!

realsocialskills said

The other advantage to toaster ovens is that a lot of them have timers that can make them automatically shut off when the time is up.

That’s a really useful safety feature for people who tend to get distracted and start fires.

self-assuring-love said:

On the other hand, if you’re sensitive to noises or in a small space, try your toaster oven’s “stay on” option (maybe combined with a timer). Some toaster ovens tick incredibly loudly when set to shut off at a time, but will be silent/much quieter when set to “stay on”. 

realsocialskills said:

That’s also a good point.

reesa-chan:

Social skills for autonomous people: When food is too hard

realsocialskills:

Related to the remembering food exists thing, do you have any advice for what to do when your depression is making preparing food seem so hard that you’d nearly prefer to just go hungry?
A couple of suggestions:
Order a pizza, or some…

reesa-chan said:

This. So much this. Also, some grocery stores will deliver food if you happen to be lucky enough to live in the right city. I have one on my list of resources for when spoons have been completely exhausted. They also deliver toilet paper, which is the most crazy awesome thing ever. Also other things, but delivery toilet paper! How amazing is it to know that if you run out but can’t face leaving the house, someone will BRING YOU TOILET PAPER!

Depending on how your brain works, it might be worth being careful about the disposable dishes, though. I know that for me it’s even harder to deal with a build up of trash than a build up of dirty dishes (and don’t get me started on how overwhelming those dishes can be!), so if you’re like me it might be easier to either reuse a mildly dirty dish or to figure out a way to go without using dishes for this meal or, if you have the resources, to wash just the one dish you’re going to eat off of.

realsocialskills said:

That’s a good point about trash. Disposable dishes aren’t a good solution for everyone.