writing tips

andreashettle:

lysikan:

realsocialskills:

I can’t think of any other blogs to ask, or just, anyway to find the answer to this question, but I’m writing a short story about a young man with chronic pain in his leg (as a side effect of lycanthorpy) and I want to know if, on a good day, but one where he was…

lysikan said:

It depends on what the cause of the chronic pain is and where. For example, if it is muscular or skeletal then dancing is out, but if it is in the nerves then dancing could be possible. Mobility aids, such as using a cane to take some of the weight off the leg, COULD reduce the amount of pain even from muscular or skeletal causes, but unlikely to reduce it enough to make the dance fun.

(My guardian suffers chronic pain in his legs from hip replacement and we got to see all three types of pain after it.)

 andreashettle said:

Also try these blogs, specifically for writers who want to write characters with disabilities:  http://disabilityinkidlit.tumblr.com and http://disabilityinkidlit.wordpress.com.

Also, consider the possibility (if both his creativity and motivation to dance is high) that the character might come up with ways to adapt the usual dance moves so they can do them with minimal pain.  There is a long history of many dancers with various kinds of disabilities who have found all sorts of ways to adapt dancing so they can still enjoy themselves.  Though I admit, I’m not sure how many of them have pain conditions.

As just one example of a pair of dancers (the man has one leg, the woman has one arm) who have adapted quite beautifully: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mK29iPaQDbg  And you can find more tapes like these, both of the same pair of dancers and with various other dancers and whole troops of dancers with various types of disabilities from around the world.  So you could look around for more examples.

cryptix23:

realsocialskills:

I can’t think of any other blogs to ask, or just, anyway to find the answer to this question, but I’m writing a short story about a young man with chronic pain in his leg (as a side effect of lycanthorpy) and I want to know if, on a good day, but one where he was…

cryptix23 said:

I usually go to Little Details, a livejournal community, for advice on this kinda stuff. Don’t need to have an account – I don’t – and I’ve gotten some useful responses.

Anonymous answer about dancing with canes

Speaking as a square dance and Scottish folk dance person…there have been people at my groups who’ve used canes while dancing, and others with limited mobility for other reasons. You adapt as best you can, and a friendly group will adapt right along with you. A good teacher, if you give them a heads-up, will be able to work with you in your particular mobility range to adapt steps and perhaps choose a good repertoire that accommodates you. You wouldn’t necessarily be doing fast dances or fancy footwork but participating in box step type stuff, especially in a group where you’re a regular, shouldn’t be a problem. 

realsocialskills said: Do you know if any of the people in your group had chronic pain as well as mobility impairment?

lysikan:

realsocialskills:

I can’t think of any other blogs to ask, or just, anyway to find the answer to this question, but I’m writing a short story about a young man with chronic pain in his leg (as a side effect of lycanthorpy) and I want to know if, on a good day, but one where he was…

lysikan said:

It depends on what the cause of the chronic pain is and where. For example, if it is muscular or skeletal then dancing is out, but if it is in the nerves then dancing could be possible. Mobility aids, such as using a cane to take some of the weight off the leg, COULD reduce the amount of pain even from muscular or skeletal causes, but unlikely to reduce it enough to make the dance fun.

(My guardian suffers chronic pain in his legs from hip replacement and we got to see all three types of pain after it.)

How to Write Women of Color and Men of Color if you are White.

kaylapocalypse:

kaylapocalypse:

A colleague of mine was talking to me recently about her misgivings about her capabilities regarding writing Women of Color. She wanted very badly to include several WOC characters in her sci-fantasy series, but she had some concerns about correct portrayal and writing them in a way that wouldn’t instantly piss people off. I told her I would write something about it that might help. So, here we have it: How to write POC without pissing everyone off and doing a horrible job.

In general, it comes down to three things. Research, Persistence and Consideration. Also. for the point of this essay, I am going to use Black women, Native Women and Mixed Race women as they each represent different individual (yet very important) racial struggles that need consideration.

1. Research is by far the most important thing. EVER. For this example, I am going to use black women.

It is important to start by trying your hardest to forget anything you think you know about black women and black female identity. As a white person, anything you would know about them you probably learned from media that is not controlled by or monitored by black women themselves. Meaning that it is likely not a good representation of black women at all. Or maybe you just have a black friend.

Which you should consider in the same way you would a control group for a science experiment.

One or two subjects would not provide conclusive evidence in regards to any hypothesis. Having one or two or even five black friends can’t help you with understanding the complex history of black discourse….

In order to start from scratch, I would first spend some time reading literature written by black women for black women. Learning the way black women have discourse among each other is the first step to understanding their perspective AND emulating their voice. Literature is the genre of media where POC have the most liberty (unlike film) to discuss certain topics or parts of their identity.

Then, I would delve into “complaints”. There are thousands upon thousands of articles where black women complain about their portrayal in media. These complaints are both valid and often eloquently expressed. It is important for you to know, what things black women (WOC) are already so fucking tired of seeing in regards to incorrect or offensive portrayals of themselves. Not only will it help you avoid making the same mistakes as white writers before you (an example of this: Arthur Golden and the hot mess that is Memoirs of a Geisha), But it will also get you upset about certain ways black women (POC women in general) are portrayed, and make you want to write them better. This can improve your writing in that not only will you avoid being offensive, but you now have the chance to be progressive and kick stereotypes out the window! 

Finally, I would take some time to follow some tumblr blogs that are run by the group you’re trying to write. This part of the research can really help because you’ll get a first hand, contemporary dialogue about issues within the specific POC community.  Which leads me to my second topic…

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